What the Government Shutdown Means for You! Which Federal Government Services Will Be Affected? Read More

Reply
Info Seeker

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

1,526 Views
Message 21 of 31

According to the BMI, I am obese. I am active, albeit at 75 a tad slower and not a strong as I once was when I played football, and threw the shot, hammer, and discus as a Track & Field athlete. I am 6'4" and weigh about 250 pounds, 5 pounds lighter than my playing weight in college. My waist is less than 40", and my primary care physician says I am healthy, although losing 15 or 20 pounds might help.

However, even 20 pounds lighter I am "OverWeight" and have to lose 60 pounds to get into the "Healthy Weight" range... This is ABSURD!

 

At age 50 I rode my bicycle across the US from Everett, Washington to Yorktown Beach, Virginia in 24 days! When I finished I was down to about 230 and looked like I had just escaped a POW camp after being held for years.

 

The BMI fails to account for bone density and mass (my bone density has been measured at 136% of expected for someone of my age and height) and there is no measure for muscle mass.

 

I believe that when one is deemed healthy by one's PCP and is happy and active the extra pounds aren't as likely to be the killer... being grumpy and fighting to measure up to an arbitrary BMI number is more likely to be the death of the person...

Report Inappropriate Content
Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

1,822 Views
Message 22 of 31

Well if we are, as a nation, obsessed with health, then it certainly isn't helping to improve our health.

 

According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, 2 in 3 adult Americans are overweight or obese. (https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/health-statistics/overweight-obesity)

 

Not all obsessions are created equally either, it seems. Smiley Happy

 

Here are some troubling obesity facts from the CDC: (https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/data/adult.html)

 

Obesity is common, serious and costly

  • More than one-third (36.5%) of U.S. adults have obesity. [Read CDC National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) data brief PDF-704KB]
  • Obesity-related conditions include heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, some of the leading causes of preventable death. [Read guidelines]
  • The estimated annual medical cost of obesity in the U.S. was $147 billion in 2008 U.S. dollars; the medical costs for people who have obesity were $1,429 higher than those of normal weight. [Read summary]

Obesity affects some groups more than others

[Read abstract Journal of American Medicine (JAMA)]

  • Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest age-adjusted rates of obesity (48.1%) followed by Hispanics (42.5%), non-Hispanic whites (34.5%), and non-Hispanic Asians (11.7%). Obesity is higher among middle age adults age 40-59 years (40.2%) and older adults age 60 and over (37.0%) than among younger adults age 20–39 (32.3%).

Obesity and socioeconomic status

[Read CDC National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) data brief[PDF-1.07MB]

  • Among non-Hispanic black and Mexican-American men, those with higher incomes are more likely to have obesity than those with low income.
  • Higher income women are less likely to have obesity than low-income women.
  • There is no significant relationship between obesity and education among men. Among women, however, there is a trend—those with college degrees are less likely to have obesity compared with less educated women.

And here's a recent Ted Talk about the world obesity epidemic:

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Conversationalist

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

1,823 Views
Message 23 of 31

A waist is a terrible thing to mind. And it's not what you eat that makes you fat, it's what's eating you that's making you fat ! 

Report Inappropriate Content
Bronze Conversationalist

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

1,942 Views
Message 24 of 31

I think we’re obsessed with healthy and just like everything, one size does not fit all. I’m one of the lucky ones, live moderately, eat moderately ... oh, and shop moderately! 

Report Inappropriate Content
Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

2,289 Views
Message 25 of 31

patriciah559514 wrote:

 

I didn't exercise for decades, myself. And ate little - very little - when I wanted to lose a few pounds. 


@patriciah559514  Ah, I see we are from different ends of the bookcase. Smiley Happy I've always been athletic. I won the most track and field events in our grade school olympics when I was 9. 

 

It's good that you illuminated the issue of metabolic health over simple measurements like BMI and weight alone.

 

How are you doing now? Have you obtained metabolic health? If so, I bet others would benefit from hearing your story.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

2,366 Views
Message 26 of 31

Epster wrote:

patriciah559514 wrote:


I think this probably also applies to 'skinny-fat' people [metabolically obese normal weight] - those who look slender but it's because they diet excessively with inadequate protein intake and/or do not exercise enough.  Very unhealthy with similar issues - inflammation, high blood sugar, low good cholesterol, high triglycerides, and/or high blood pressure - all exacerbated by poor diet and little physical activity. 


@patriciah559514  Yes, I think you are right. We've probably all known someone who is slim but who doesn't workout and who eats poorly that has ended up with the health problems you mention.

 

 


I didn't exercise for decades, myself. And ate little - very little - when I wanted to lose a few pounds. 

Report Inappropriate Content
Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

2,564 Views
Message 27 of 31

So I've been thinking about this study this morning. It's frustrating, because we keep trying to slip a one-size-fits-all approach over the ever widening hips of the obesity problem. Clearly, a person who works out enough to achieve great vitals and who still carries extra weight may nevertheless have marginally elevated health risks. But I think those statistically few examples get in the way of the study's conclusions, especially when researchers failed to track subject's lifestyle data. So what are we really left with? Argh. Smiley Happy 

 

 

Here's a pertinent snippet: "“The bottom line is that metabolically healthy obesity doesn’t exist,” said Dr. Rishi Caleyachetty, of the College of Medical and Dental Sciences at the University of Birmingham in England, who was the lead author of the paper, published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. “Obesity is not a benign condition.”

 

But critics say the analysis, based on the electronic health records of 3.5 million British patients who were followed from 1995 to 2015, leaves a lot out. Doctors’ records don’t typically capture lifestyle habits, so the study fails to account for the wide-ranging effects of diet. They classify weight status by using body mass index, a formula based on height and weight that doesn’t distinguish muscle from fat. Most important, critics say, such analyses don’t take fitness level or physical activity into account."

 

I'm going to go work off ~800 calories (and some frustration) now. Smiley Happy

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

2,594 Views
Message 28 of 31

patriciah559514 wrote:


I think this probably also applies to 'skinny-fat' people [metabolically obese normal weight] - those who look slender but it's because they diet excessively with inadequate protein intake and/or do not exercise enough.  Very unhealthy with similar issues - inflammation, high blood sugar, low good cholesterol, high triglycerides, and/or high blood pressure - all exacerbated by poor diet and little physical activity. 


@patriciah559514  Yes, I think you are right. We've probably all known someone who is slim but who doesn't workout and who eats poorly that has ended up with the health problems you mention.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

2,670 Views
Message 29 of 31

nyadrn wrote:

IMG_0830.JPG

 

 

 

Can you be fit and healthy, even if you’re overweight? And will working out, despite the extra pounds, reduce your risk of a heart attack?

The idea that you can be “fat but fit” has long been controversial. While health experts endorse physical activity as beneficial, many doctors view the concept of being “fat but fit” with suspicion.

Now a new study, believed to be the largest of its kind, suggests that even when overweight or obese people are free of health complications, they are still more likely to develop heart disease than their peers who aren’t overweight.

It didn’t matter whether obese people were free from diabetes, high blood pressure or high cholesterol, a condition sometimes referred to as “metabolically healthy obesity.” As long as they were obese, they were at modestly higher risk for having a stroke, at nearly 50 percent greater risk of coronary heart disease and had nearly double the risk of developing heart failure than people who were not overweight and in similar metabolic health.

https://mobile.nytimes.com/2017/10/26/well/eat/fat-but-fit-the-controversy-continues.html?rref=colle...

 

 


I think this probably also applies to 'skinny-fat' people [metabolically obese normal weight] - those who look slender but it's because they diet excessively with inadequate protein intake and/or do not exercise enough.  Very unhealthy with similar issues - inflammation, high blood sugar, low good cholesterol, high triglycerides, and/or high blood pressure - all exacerbated by poor diet and little physical activity. 

Report Inappropriate Content
Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

2,657 Views
Message 30 of 31

Wait. There's obese and there's overweight. Two different conditions.  If memory serves (I should look this up, but I just listened to Bruno Mars' The Lazy Song, so ...) Smiley Happy obesity is 30 or more pounds overweight.

 

Back in my mountaineering days I weighed between 175-180. That's 12 pounds overweight, technically, for my 5'9" height, but I was quite muscular, so my body fat was 22%. Still, technically overweight. That wasn't the opinion of my sports doctor, but again, still technically overweight. Not obese. And elite athlete fit. (according to vitals, et cetera)

 

Right now I'm 154 pounds and heading to around 149 (exact target weight to be determined), this of course being due to changing sports. My body fat today (as determined by an athlete's BMI calculator) is 19%. Cyclists are lean. Mountaineers are not. Smiley Happy I was fit at both ends of the spectrum. 

 

Overweight does not always mean fat. Obese does. That story text confuses the two. 

 

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content