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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 1 of 31

Oh you are crazy but just not a bad crazy.  Those who make stuff up and think it is fact are BAD crazy.  I don't like them at all.

 

I get it; you are a compulsive perfectionist.  Well, it takes one to know one.  We are the only ones who have meaningful efforts. I am not not wrapped as tight as you but I rate myself as a AAA. I can make an impossible task look easy.  (I used to anyway)

 

We are a small undevalued group.  Most everything worth while has been achieved by one of us. In your case everyone you have competed agaist was the same but maybe just a liitle less crazy so you beat them. Who else has what it takes to do something totally outstanding?  Most normal perons only see the crazy not what we can do.   

 

I am older with less testostrone than a 60 year old man.  I need to work harder to keep it on which I don't.

 

How does cycling retaine balance?  I thought balance was all about nerve speed.  I have poor balance and poor hearing.  By the time the brain gets the signal and tries to correct it is too late you are already off balance.  Both are caused by the same thing.  I can't keep up with someone talking if they speek softly, have a high voice or have a strong accent.  I can't keep up with trying to decypher what they are saying.  I tell them to speak up. Nerve speed starts to degrade in our mid teens.  That is why gynmnasts age out earlier than any other athlete because they need such fast reflexes.  Depending on how crutal your reflex speed needs to be, detrumines when you age out of a sport. It isn't about strength or indurance.  It is how fast do your nerves work so you can hit that 110 MPH fast ball exactly where it needs to be hit.

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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 2 of 31

@RonMesnard So you don't think I'm crazy, eh? Can I pay you to say that early and often around here, because I think plenty of folks here on the forums think exactly that about me. Smiley Happy

 

Statistically, I guess you are right that strenuous exercise truncates the life of the 50 plusser ... but considering that by that age most of us are on some sort of balance-interrupting prescription and that many have serious diabetes and that a huge portion of us are overweight to obese ... well, I think we can toss out those statistics for the likes of me. 

 

I'm a competitive cyclist with 11 gold medals to my name. Not normal. Not average. Still out there pushing the limits and having fun doing it. Smiley Happy I weigh less than I did on my wedding day; have no health issues, am strong as an ox and twice as aggressive Smiley Happy and am on zero prescriptions. These statistics, by the way, hold for senior athletes across the nation. They are strong. They are lean. They are on fewer prescriptions and they are mighty. Smiley Happy 

 

This summer I was honored to watch as a 90 year old cyclist took 15 minutes off the 20K course record for his age group at St George, Utah. He works out nearly as hard as I do, though he's 30+ years my senior. He's also in perfect health. And another cycling friend, this one 81, didn't like that I beat his times in '16, so spent all year working out harder ... he took minutes off each of his own times. He just emailed me that he's cycled every day so far in December, racking up 7,500 miles for the year. He's still trying to get faster! Smiley Happy

 

What is useful for us oldsters wanting to retain balance and mobility is muscle retention. You do have to work those muscles to keep them. But you may not have to work as hard as me or the two other cyclists I mentioned. 

 

Smiley Happy

 

Be well.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 3 of 31

This has been an enjoyable conversation.  You appear smart, informed and not nuts.  The last being the most important.  There are so many crazy bloggers.

 

My Dr suggested walking.  

 

"Good health starts on the plate" no, it comes from minimiziing your health risks.  Yes, you are correct, I am a risk minimizer.  It has actually worked beyond my expectations in both health and finance.  Even though most of my Drs are tops for the DC area, I believe I am responsible for my own health and know more about my issues than they do.  I have enough science background to understand any biological or medical study or paper.  I have also gotten my DNA tested and that was a real eye opener.  I used 23&me to test and Promethease to run a health report.  That is run by the same group that published and maintains SNPedia. 23&me provides the cheapest quality test with over 20,0000 genes reported.  SNPedia is the repository for gene study.  For $5 you get a report and you can re visit yearly for free to get an update.  I just got mine today.  They had a few hundred more genes.  The most interesting find is I am in the highest catigory of 4 for metabolizing drugs/poisons. The half life of a drug is half that of the lowest performer.  The published half lifes are for the middle two that are about the same.  I can drink most persons under the table but may require extra antibiotics, etc. So it is mostly a bad thing that I can live with.   

 

I am a long time diabetic.  At 15 years of diabetes my Endo fanagled me to get exhaustive cardio testing.  The bill was almost 20k.  The results were, even though over 60% of the general public my age has moderate CVD, I didn't.  The fact that I was a long time diabetic that was remarkable I might be the healthiest diabetic he could remember seeing.  Of course he usually sees persons who have serious enough indicators for CVD that they need to see a cardio.  Still, I was at high risk (diabetes) with only a tiny amount of plaque. 

 

By knowing what all your risks are and then adressing them is a powerfulo way to stay healthy I am usually pushing for BP and diabetic meds.  I prefer to stay lower than even my endo likes but it is my body.  I am a rairity in all possible diabetic complications.  I do not go crazy with diet.  My wife thinks I am living dangerously with eating sweets etc.  I only eat what I can and not press my luck (risk prevention).  I take more diabetic meds than a 'health nut' diabetic.  That is much better for you than having a strict diet.  At sugar levels like I keep it is all about your insulin resistance which is the cause of CVD not high sugars.  Of course, above 300 glucose will destroy artery walls even if you have low IR.

 

Anyway statistically, strenuous workouts if you are over 50 will shorten you life.  You are 100% correct we are responcible for our health not our Drs.  It is all about the choices we make and how good was the information we base our decisions on.   

 

 

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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 4 of 31

RonMesnard wrote:

A few points...

 

We are all suggested to keep BGs below 140 to maintain health.  That is a conservative number but excersising when your BG is already at 200 as your artical suggests is fool hearty.  Excessive BGs, above 300, are thought to damage your vascular system.  Why would people purposfully damage their vascular system?  I bet this is the reason they die before their time.  It is when idelogy overcomes common sense. 


@RonMesnard  Yeah, well, there's just no way to write a concise article to cover every health condition. So this is where common sense comes in, eh? If you are at the kind of risk described, one would think your doctor would tell you to start with slow, measured exercise rather than the kind of sweat-dripping, heart-pumping 780 calories burned workout I just got in 46 minutes on the mini-trampoline. I do not have a blood glucose issue nor do I have a heart problem. Common sense: talk with your doctor; find out what exercises are appropritate ... and probably most of all take charge of your health. You are  in the driver's seat: so drive. Smiley Happy

 

Good health starts on the plate, no? Smiley Happy I made a peach tart rather than a pumpkin pie for Christmas dessert because it has far less sugar. And we skipped those fatty, calorie and carb rich foods and treats. Also we were mindful of portion control, and the need to have a feast that was predominantly vegetables. 

 

To improve health we must learn to think carefully about our choices. Or so I think. Smiley Happy

 

And hey, Happy New Year! May you meet and exceed your health goals!

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 5 of 31

A few points...

 

We are all suggested to keep BGs below 140 to maintain health.  That is a conservative number but excersising when your BG is already at 200 as your artical suggests is fool hearty.  Excessive BGs, above 300, are thought to damage your vascular system.  Why would people purposfully damage their vascular system?  I bet this is the reason they die before their time.  It is when idelogy overcomes common sense. 

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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 6 of 31

 

@RonMesnard  Yes, it can. (depends upon the person's health and BG levels) That said, non-athletes do not need to work out to the same level as an athlete to realize benefit.

 

Here'a a good discussion on the subject: https://www.diabeteshealth.com/why-does-my-sugar-go-up-after-exercise/

 

A snippet: "Athletes who workout strenuously on a regular basis may not need to eat as large a feeding as expected before strenuous sessions. Also, as the body adapts to intense training, the hormonal secretion decreases when the same intensity workouts are done. Consequently, an intense workout at the beginning of a season that caused a surge in BG may cause a lesser rise in BG at mid-season."

 

Their summary (for those with BG issues): "In summary, monitor BG before exercise, during exercise if the sessions last beyond an hour, and after exercise one or more times. For non-athletes, high-intensity exercise isn’t needed to improve fitness, health in general, and improve BG control. It even tends to make BG management more difficult and increase the risk of injury, sore muscles, and heart attack, and may discourage you from sticking with your exercise regimen."

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 7 of 31

The intense excersise shoots your blood sugar to crazy levels (500-100) in a super intense excersise.  Probably to power your body during a possible life threatening situation.  It is probably all the stresss hormones that makes that possible may produce the wear and tare on your body.

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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 8 of 31

RonMesnard wrote:
Thanks! I thought diet was the only way to lose weight. I only get way hungrier and eat more if I try to lose weight with exercise. I do think exercise is essential for good health but we need to reduce the intensity as we age. Serious aerobics stresses your body and shortens life. I read a study by your mid 50s people who jog for exercise vs walking don't live as long. I suspect this is probably linked to the individual and not everyone will react the same way.

@RonMesnard  Yes, I've experienced that post-workout hunger as well. I've successfully combated it by drinking lots of water; eating something that's loaded with fiber (fiber makes you feel fuller) and sometimes just denying myself, so as not to let my temporary hunger undo long term gains. And sometimes, (like the day after we cycled 100 miles) I just let myself graze. Of course, I don't have donuts of chips or cookies or things that are dietary no-nos the house, so it's pretty safe for me to go grazing through the fridge. Smiley Happy I'm likely to pull out some cauliflower, hummus and mustard or eat an apple with some peanut butter. Smiley Happy

 

Best wishes!

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 9 of 31

 

 

Just saw this on Twitter. Think it fits right in here. Smiley Happy

out train_ Nope.jpg

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: ‘Fat but Fit’? The Controversy Continues

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Message 10 of 31
Thanks! I thought diet was the only way to lose weight. I only get way hungrier and eat more if I try to lose weight with exercise. I do think exercise is essential for good health but we need to reduce the intensity as we age. Serious aerobics stresses your body and shortens life. I read a study by your mid 50s people who jog for exercise vs walking don't live as long. I suspect this is probably linked to the individual and not everyone will react the same way.
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