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Bronze Conversationalist
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-30-2016

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 1 of 22 (901 Views)

Forgive me for I am no health care professional and I don't know what the CD site is.  However, many years ago I studied BMI and the M stands for mass.  The only ways to measure mass in an accurate way with regards to your body is with an electrical current to measure the resistance through your body and by placing you in a tank of water and being fully submerged to measure the amount of water you actually displace.  Without those more accurate measures BMI is just a rough guesstimate and should be taken as such.  I've seen the charts in doctors' offices and all they measure is height and weight.  I'm sure the original intent was as a gauge to see if further testing was necessary, but somehow it seems the medical profession is gradually leaning more toward the money and away from actual health care.  

Super Social Butterfly
Posts: 603
Registered: ‎07-23-2010

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 2 of 22 (1,416 Views)

My BMI has flopped off the charts!  🍺🍕🍔🌭🍦🍩🍹

Info Seeker
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎11-10-2009

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 3 of 22 (1,635 Views)

My chiropractor told me years ago that the most accurate way to measure body-mass index is by using calipers on certain body parts when the person is standing in water.  I don't see why a simple equation between height and weight means one is getting a proper BMI measurement.  I know many fit people who, because of muscle development, weigh more than they look, since muscle is heavy and fat is very light. This would seem to me to effect a simplistic body-mass index measurement (as inaccurate).

Gold Conversationalist
Posts: 69
Registered: ‎03-21-2016

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 4 of 22 (1,637 Views)

I don't think that BMI is always an accurate way to see if a person is at a healthy weight.  A very muscular 5'4" male body builder might weigh more than the charts suggest he should weigh, because the charts don't take into consideration extreme muscle mass.  That healthy muscle tissue is just consdered "weight" and muscle weighs more than fat. 

 

As for me, I've shrunk down to 4'10" and I'm very small boned with fair muscle mass from running and working on my farm.  Yet, I'm considered underweight according to the BMI index.  They aren't taking into consideration my petite bones vs my muscle. 

 

There should be a better way to ascertain whether or not a person is over- or underweight.  In addition, a person's overall health and physical abilities should be taken into consideration when declaring that a person is "healthy".

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 5,020
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

[ Edited ]
Message 5 of 22 (1,899 Views)

@bh70956984 I'm a bit light of center of the calculation considered 'normal' BMI for my age, gender and height. I'm a ridiculously healthy competitive cyclist who can tell you that those calculators don't account for every body type. Athletes, for instance.

 

Our doctor has moved away from the BMI measurement and now takes greater stock in the fact that my waist is less than 30 inches. FWIW and all.

 

Here's a story about the waist to hip ratio as a better gauge of health for older people: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2009/09/090901150951.htm

 

The summary: 

Body mass index readings may not be the best gauge of obesity in older adults, according to new  (this was published in 2009) research from endocrinologists and geriatricians. Instead, they say, the ratio of waist size to hip size may be a better indicator when it comes to those over 70. Obesity is often associated with premature mortality because it leads to an increased risk of diabetes, heart attack, stroke and other major health problems.

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Info Seeker
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-10-2015

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 6 of 22 (1,940 Views)

"BMI is a person’s weight in kilograms divided by the square of height in meters."  Direct quote from the CD website.  The intent may have been different, but BMI IS a two dimensional measure. 

 

I'm sure there are better alternatives that recognize all of the other aspects measured, but BMI as defined is nonsensical.

Bronze Conversationalist
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-30-2016

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 7 of 22 (1,975 Views)

Actually, true BMI is not just 3 dimentional but is supposed to take into account "mass," which can only be measured accurately using electrical current and displacement, as in being fully submerged in water.  But since a real BMI test is seldom done, they try to simplify it and put it on a chart, which leaves out a couple of different variables, mainly muscle mass and even bone density.

Info Seeker
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎02-10-2015

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 8 of 22 (2,005 Views)

To say BMI is "inaccurate" is not correct.  "Nonsensical" is much more appropriate.  BMI is weight divided by the square of height.  For the ratio to make any sense, we would either need to exist in two dimensions instead of three or everyone would need to have the same measurement in one dimension.  

 

I personally am three dimensional and am not the same thickness, height, or width as my friends.  I'm reasonably confident all of my friends are three dimensional as well (although there is one guy I've never seen sideways ...)

Bronze Conversationalist
Posts: 16
Registered: ‎04-30-2016

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 9 of 22 (2,037 Views)

I'll get back to the BMI.  First, the chart on what constitutes over weight.  That part is not scientific at all and I believe they put way too much emphasis on it.  My ideal weight for my height is supposed to be something around 170, which is ridiculous.  For the last 40 years I've fluctuated between 180 and 250.  In the last couple of years I've been holding right around 220.  I really do have a lot of muscle mass and would love to be at 210.  But basically, I've felt pretty dang good lately, so I'm OK with them saying I'm 50 pounds over weight.  They act like everyone should be thin as a rail, like the fashion industry.  They sell drugs for a living.  Now the BMI.  If a full blown test is not done and only height and weight and age and so forth are used, then it is inaccurate.  A better test uses electric current running through your body, which takes into account your muscle mass.  An even more accurate measure also incorporate floating in water, which doesn't get done very often.  I remember when I was close to 40 and probably in my top shape ever, I had a fairly complete test for BMI done.  The nurse figured it would be high since I was about 195 pounds, which is "over weight."  When the test was completed, she was amazed and said that she had never had one come out so dead on the money perfect BMI for my height and age.  Quite often, muscle mass is not figured in and that can be very different for different people.  Bone density can also be a contributing factor, which is never measured.  If you watch Am. Got Talent, you saw the big exfootball player do some dancing and moves, with energy and agility through the roof.  Why would he want to weigh 1/2 his weight or less?  It's about the money and the drug sales.  You know if you feel good or not and if not, you make adjustments, not all at once, but over a longer period.

Info Seeker
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎06-25-2015

Re: Do you think your BMI is accurate? Is your weight healthy?

Message 10 of 22 (2,142 Views)

I think BMI is not only inaccurate, the continuous labeling of "overweight" that I get from my doctor is depressing.  I feel better now than I have in decades, exercizing more and eating better, yet he insists I need to lose more weight.  I've told him if my chart has a self-rating "Quality of Life" checkbox, with a 1-10 scale (10 being best), I'm happily a 10!