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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,429
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: 7 Senior Fitness All-Stars Who Stay Competitive

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This is me (between the cones) getting ready to win my 3rd (of 4) gold medal at a recumbent racing event last month. You can come back. You just need to get the journey started. My journey started 50 pounds and over 2 years ago. Yours can start today. 

 

 

kearney start line cu.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,429
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: 7 Senior Fitness All-Stars Who Stay Competitive

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A high school athlete, a hiker, mountain climber, kayaker, snowshoer and general outdoorsy type, I recently went through a few years of physical agony when I could no longer, due to repetitive injuries, summit mountains. I live in the Rockies. This was big. This was bad. This was a bear.

 

And I got soft. It has taken me over 2 (excrusiatingly long) years to get back into shape. I'm 58. It was not easy. I got up at 3:30 AM to fit in all the things I wanted to fit in, including 1500-2500 calorie burning recumbent rides, 320-calorie burning walks, strength building weight training sessions, 800-calorie burning mini trampoline sessions, and, you know, life.

 

But the weight did come off. And I did get stronger. And I did regain my shape. All it took was the same old, same old formula: eat less calories than you expend. 

 

If you feel soft and don't want to be, let me encourage you to get moving. Today. Now. The internet will be here when you get back. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,429
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

7 Senior Fitness All-Stars Who Stay Competitive

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Message 3 of 3 (283 Views)

Ever wonder if you’re too old to train for a new sport? Consider the case of R. Laurence Macon, a trial lawyer from Dallas, Tex. who recently broke a world record for the number of marathons completed in a single year, with 113 certified races in 2011 alone. According to Reuters, Macon completed his final marathon of the year on New Year’s Eve day, which was also the day he turned 67. Although the feat hasn’t yet been submitted to the Guinness Book of World Records, his advanced age has gotten a great deal of attention. Though he insists he’s no elite athlete.

 

Macon, who said he is in “lousy” physical shape for 67, said he just “goes out there and puts one foot in front of the other” and doesn’t attempt speed records. In fact, he said his fastest marathon time is four hours, 45 minutes — twice the usual winning time.

The story is certainly an inspiration to many would-be older marathoners, but Macon isn’t the only Social Security recipient who tears up the track. A growing number of senior citizens — or even just those who’ve aged out of conventional sport — are competing at major athletic events like marathons, and some are outperforming athletes half their age.

 

But even for older adults who are in “lousy” shape, the process of training in a sport can be excellent for health. Studies show that regular exercise and training can slow the degeneration of bone density, muscular development and balance in older adults — three physical functions that decline with age....

 

 

Read the rest of this article and see the slideshowhttp://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/01/07/senior-athletes-masters-athletes-track-_n_1187679.html

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving