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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Traveling with your Dog

Do you travel with your dog? We've been taking our dogs along on our vacations for twenty years. They've been to the Rio Grande in New Mexico, camping in Utah and have walked on the beach in Florida. I recommend the web site http://www.dogfriendly.com/  as a valuable resource for finding places to stay.

 

Here are some travel hints that we have learned (sometimes the hard way) over the years:

 

1. Always travel with your dog in a crate. It's dangerous to allow them to roam about in your vehicle—both for you and for the dog.

 

2. Take along a bag containing a collapsible water bowl and a container of water for your dog. Keep all of his grooming supplies, toys, treats, plastic bags for poop, etc, in this bag and keep this bag near his crate so that it is easy to reach.

 

3. Stop at rest areas to allow your dog a walk. Most rest areas have a designated area in which you can walk your dog. Please pick up his poop. Offer your dog water.

 

4. Carry a copy of your dog's medical records, showing his vaccinations. It may be that you choose to board him while in a destination city and will need these. Or if your dog becomes ill these will be a help.

 

5. Choose a pet friendly motel (like La Quinta or Motel 6) and ask for a room that opens to the parking area. This makes it easier to take your dog out if he should need a bathroom during the night. Again, please pick up after your dog. We find that the interior rooms have more noise from people coming and going and this upsets our dog causing him to bark.

 

6. Please keep your dog on a leash when walking him and choose areas that allow dogs in the area. Be aware that your pet is under stress from all the strange smells and sights and may not react in his usual way to strangers. Keep him on a tight leash when approaching others.

 

7. If you are staying in a rental house or condo please ask the owner before leaving the dog alone in the unit. Make these arrangements before renting the unit. Always crate the dog before leaving him there and be sure he has water in his crate. Do not leave him for a long period of time.

 

8. Do not leave your dog in a hot car—ever.

 

Our dogs have always loved traveling but sometimes do get tired and cranky after about a week. Be aware of this and give them plenty of love and attention. 

 

dogNM.jpg

 

MeWilson.jpg

 

Frances

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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Re: Traveling with your Dog / Adventures

[ Edited ]

My husband always refers to any "events" (like storms, car trouble, getting lost, etc) that we have while on vacation as adventures. Over the years while traveling with our dogs we have had quite a few "doggie" adventures.

 

About ten years ago we went to Zion National Park in Utah with our previous two dogs, Rufus and Charlie. Both were Wire Fox Terriers as is our current dog Wilson. We camped in the area that allowed dogs, in a tent, sleeping on two cots. The tent was zipped during the night so that the dogs could not get out. As I recall Charlie was sleeping on top of me in the cot and Rufus was on the floor near my husband. It was just before dawn when we heard the noise. The dogs were instantly alert and on their feet, sniffing at the zipped door.

 

I cautiously  unzipped the door and looked out. Charles stuck his head out beside me. There were at least six deer milling around our picnic table. This so startled Charlie that he let out a deep "woof" and fell backwards into the tent onto Rufus. Rufus, in turn, jumped into the cot with my husband awakening him. Then the barking began in earnest. Wire Fox Terriers are right at the top of the "doggie" barking list and our were not exceptions. It took us a while to get them quieted down. The deer, of course, fled the area.

 

This noise must have awaken the entire camp because I soon began to hear tents being unzipped and the clatter of coffee pots and camping stoves being lit. We climbed out ourselves and sheepishly began to make our own coffee. It was then that I heard the sound of two people talking as they walked towards us. I was thinking that they were coming to complain about the noise but this was not the case.

 

The young woman said to her husband "I told you that was a Wire Fox Terrier that I heard barking at those deer. See, I was right."

 

As it turned out they had owned a Wire Fox Terrier who had recently died at age seventeen. Both of them were absolutely delighted to see our dogs and we swapped dog stories. When they left they told us that when they returned home they would begin their search for a new dog.

 

I'd love to read any stories others have about traveling with their dogs (or other pets).

 

Frances

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Prosecco62
Posts: 3,644
Topics: 26
Kudos: 4,071
Registered: ‎07-31-2010

Re: Traveling with your Dog / Adventures

[ Edited ]

Frances, I loved your two posts (and pictures, yet!) about travels with your dogs.  Your suggestions are spot on.  I would like to add something I read yesterday about leaving dogs in cars.  The article said that even at an outside air temp of 75 degrees and with the windows opened a bit, that the strength of the sun shining on the car could raise the temperature to dangerous levels so do not be lulled into thinking one's dogs will be all right for a short time in the car.

 

I use all of your suggestions when traveling with my Japanese Chin and Maltese.  They are good little travelers but after a week or so, it wears thin, as you pointed out.  The constant stimulation from being in new environments and meeting new friends is exhausting for them.  When I come home from a vacation with the two of them, they sleep about 23 out of 24 hours for the first two days they are home.  Poor babies!  However, they wouldn't think of allowing me to go alone...not if they can help it!  They love the adventures!

 

~  Mimi

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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Re: Traveling with your Dog / Adventures


Prosecco62 wrote:

 I would like to add something I read yesterday about leaving dogs in cars.  The article said that even at an outside air temp of 75 degrees and with the windows opened a bit, that the strength of the sun shining on the car could raise the temperature to dangerous levels so do not be lulled into thinking one's dogs will be all right for a short time in the car.


~  Mimi


Yes, I agree. We usually take our trips in April and late October for this reason. Often we carry fruit and sandwich materials and stop for lunch at rest areas where we can give the dogs a break. If we do stop (usually for breakfast) our van has a sun roof and we usually open it to let in air even if it is below 75 degrees. We've been know to get up from our table and go outside just to check on our dogs.

Frances

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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Re: Traveling with your Dog / Adventures


Prosecco62 wrote:

 They are good little travelers but after a week or so, it wears thin, as you pointed out.  The constant stimulation from being in new environments and meeting new friends is exhausting for them.

~  Mimi


Mimi,

I remember the point at which it "wore thin" for Rufus and Charlie on one of our trips to New Mexico. We were returning from Colorado and were on our way home after two weeks of being away.

 

At four P.M. we pulled into Taos hoping to get a motel room but found that a wool festival had filled all the rooms. Driving on to the next small town, Espanola, we found only one motel that would accept dogs and they said "one small dog". We chose to assume they meant one small dog per person.

 

Unfortunately the motel had the rooms opening into an inner hallway so we had to lug the dogs crates out of the van and down the hall along with our suitcases. The dogs were tired after riding in the car all day and we gave them a walk around the parking lot. There was no other place available.

 

Later my husband remembered something he'd forgotten in the van and left, forgetting to take the room key. To get back into the room he knocked on the door. This caused Rufus and Charlie to both run to the door, barking and fighting with each other. This is their normal pattern but usually it stops of its own accord when I open the door. This time I was worried about the noise and being thrown out of the only dog friendly motel in the town. So I made a mistake and grabbed both dogs by their collars to keep them apart. Unfortunately I had no hand available to open the door. I released Rufus and he flew at Charlie, biting me on my thumb where it was holding Charlie's collar. I used my free hand to open the door and let my husband inside.

 

Together we managed to break up the dogs and put them in their crates to cool off. Terriers can go into a blind rage if allowed to fight and we certainly did not want this. Unfortunately my hand was bleeding, as was Charlie's ear which had been nicked in the fight. The dogs soon quieted down but we slept fitfully that night. I've often wondered what the cleaning staff thought of the blood on the towel we left in the bathroom. I had tried to wash it out but the stains remained.

 

Frances

 

 

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Info Seeker
jf1619
Posts: 1
Registered: ‎03-21-2014

Re: Traveling with your Dog

I've enjoyed reading about the canine travel adventures.  My husband and I travel with our Persian cat, Ashleigh.  She is good little traveler (weighing all of 6 pounds) and makes herself at home in our travel trailer when we are camping.  We have a crate that she travels in - a BIG crate - purple of course, with mesh siding so she can see what is going  on.  We had Ashleigh microchipped before our latest adventure - just in case.  She managed to slip out of the camper at the Devil's Tower campground a few weeks ago.  All of the campers around us had BIG dogs and I was praying that we could recover her before she became someone's "snack."  We managed to lure her out from under the camper with one of her favorite toys and quickly put her back inside.  She didn't attempt to escape after that.Ashleigh

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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Re: Traveling with your Dog

[ Edited ]

Ashleigh is a beautiful cat. What kind is she? My brother-in-law has two that look a lot like her. It's always a danger that a pet will get loose and then lost while traveling.I'm glad you were able to catch Ashleigh and that she came to no harm. We have our dog microchiped also.

 

Years ago, when we were traveling with Rufus and Charlie, Charlie got loose. We were heading to New Mexico and had stopped off in Austin, Texas to visit with my husband's brother and family. His house had a courtyard that was enclosed but the gate was wrought iron bars. I had thought the bars were too close for our dogs to get out through. . . wrong! Chaos managed to squeeze out and was walking around in their back yard, which dropped down into a wooded ravine. There were coyotes and other creatures in this ravine and it was densely overgrown. As we tried to get close to Charlie, he would run thinking this was a new version of the "chase" game. We carried a "squeaky" toy with us for such an emergency. It was one that was round and furry and gave off a sound like a squirrel fussing. Terriers cannot resist chasing a squirrel and Chaos, true to form, ran toward the sound and we were able to catch him. I am so glad that we had that toy with us because it would have been hard to have caught him if he'd gotten down into the ravine.

 

Frances

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Bronze Conversationalist
jb41091389
Posts: 15
Registered: ‎04-09-2014

Re: Traveling with your Dog

We would love to travel more but we don't do it because of our little dog. We don't like camping. To find a hotel who accepts dogs is not that much of a problem and there is always La Quinta. The problem is the restaurants. It's hard to find restaurants that will accept your dog even on the patio. We are not McDonald people, so for us it is a real problem. We would love to go to Zion National Park. No problem to find a hotel, restaurant is another ball game. One city I can say is dog friendly is Sedona, Az. Lot of hotels accept the dogs and you can find quite a few nice restaurants where you can dine on their patio with your dog.
Janine
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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Re: Traveling with your Dog


jb41091389 wrote:
We would love to travel more but we don't do it because of our little dog. We don't like camping. To find a hotel who accepts dogs is not that much of a problem and there is always La Quinta. The problem is the restaurants. It's hard to find restaurants that will accept your dog even on the patio.

Yes, that can be a problem when traveling. In the last few years we have not camped but have rented a dog friendly house or condo for several days or a week. I always inquire of the owner, before renting, if its okay to leave my dog "crated" while we go out to eat. We also travel in the Spring or Fall when it is cooler outside. We eat out at night usually and have often left our dog(s) in their crates in the van while we eat. Our van has a sunroof that slides open to let in air if necessary. This has worked for us. They feel secure in their crates and rarely bark or make any noise—just sleep.

Frances

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Recognized Social Butterfly
Sparkel18
Posts: 913
Registered: ‎07-15-2009

Re: Traveling with your Dog / Adventures


Sparkel18 wrote:

About ten years ago we went to Zion National Park in Utah with our previous two dogs, Rufus and Charlie. Both were Wire Fox Terriers as is our current dog Wilson. We camped in the area that allowed dogs, in a tent, sleeping on two cots. The tent was zipped during the night so that the dogs could not get out. As I recall Charlie was sleeping on top of me in the cot and Rufus was on the floor near my husband. It was just before dawn when we heard the noise. The dogs were instantly alert and on their feet, sniffing at the zipped door.



I found the photos from this trip this morning and thought I would post them. Below are Rufus and Charlie peering out the tent door in the Zion Campground.

 

Rufus&Charlie.jpg

 

This next photo is of the deer that startled Rufus and Charlie.

Deer.jpg

 

This next photo is of our dogs cooling off in the Virgin River near the campground.

DogsWater.jpg

 

This next photo is of Rufus (who always thought he was King of the dog world) sniffing a Malamute on the path. Charlie was hiding behind me. He did not trust other dogs and knew he was not a king. Charlie was a very realistic little dog unlike Rufus who had no real sense of his size.

Rufus.jpg

 

Frances

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