The House Bill Would Mean a Tax Hike for Millions of Seniors. Learn More

Reply
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,550
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

Message 11 of 18 (1,724 Views)

@JaneCares - Excellent point, about family visits ("oversight")!

 

When my aunt was in a private for profit nursing home, after her hip replacement, I visited her vitually every day in the afternoon. I felt very bad for residents who didn't have visitors, even though there were activities for them to keep busy.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 261
Registered: ‎05-04-2011

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

Message 12 of 18 (1,718 Views)

Just to chime in, i think there is a different between non profit and for profit, with the non profit slightly better. And if you are or your loved one belong to a church, it can be terrific to use those connections. The Quakers have Kendall, which is not for the slight of pocket book... there's an ancient building that used to be a convent outside of DC that is usually rated first or second, run by polish nuns, but it's not much to look at...

 

many variables to juggle. 

 

so much good advice here and so glad you asked!

 

Jane

Frequent Social Butterfly
Posts: 261
Registered: ‎05-04-2011

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

Message 13 of 18 (1,687 Views)
this is KEY

Another, generally accepted fact about care is that residents who have family that regularly visit, specifically. observe how well 'mom' is being cared for, get better care.
Conversationalist
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-06-2016

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

Message 14 of 18 (1,618 Views)

That's great insights. Thanks!

Valued Social Butterfly
Posts: 8,773
Registered: ‎08-18-2008

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

Message 15 of 18 (1,616 Views)

retiredtraveler

I agree with most everything you have said and thought you might find this recent news interesting.

 

KHN 01/04/2017 New Nursing Home Rules Offer Residents More Control Of Their Care

 

The federal Medicare and Medicaid programs pay for most of the nation’s nursing home care — roughly $75 billion in 2014 — and in return, facilities must comply with government rules. The new regulations, proposed late last year by Health and Human Services Secretary Sylvia Mathews Burwell, take effect in three phases. The first kicked in in November.

 

Ensuring a qualified staff: Consumer groups had urged federal officials to set minimum staffing levels for registered nurses and nursing staff, but the industry had opposed any mandates and none was included in the final rule. Instead, facilities must have enough skilled and competent staff to meet residents’ needs. There are also specific training requirements for caring for residents with dementia and for preventing elder abuse.

 

“Competency and staffing levels are not mutually exclusive,” said Toby Edelman, a senior policy attorney at the Center for Medicare Advocacy. Person-centered care and other improvements “don’t mean anything if you don’t have the staff who know the residents … and can figure out why Mrs. Smith is screaming.”

 

Yet, requiring a certain number of nurses could backfire, said Gifford. “It could actually result in places that are above those ratios lowering their staffing levels and other places that would increase staffing when they don’t need it and could be putting their resources into better care to meet the needs of the residents.”

Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,098
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

[ Edited ]
Message 16 of 18 (1,623 Views)

"...However, many people told me those ratings are not true reflections of quality of care. They also told me in general non-profit nursing homes are better than for profit ones....".

 

I have had the experience of placing my mom into three nursing homes as she worsened. I was also, as a short, last, career, a CNA in a nursing home as well as a hospital.

   IMHO --- It's nearly impossible to tell what a 'quality' home is, or more specifically, judge the quality of care in advance other than to weed out the worse offenders (which, as you know, can be done online). That is, you can see how many complaints/violations have been levied against particular places.

   What so many of us have found out, the quality of care is almost totally dependent on the staff working at a given facility. On one shift, you get a great person. The next shift, not so much. CNA's are poorly paid (you can make as much, or more, at Walmart), and turnover is great. So you get a great CNA to take care of mom 5 days a week, on a particular shift and poof, they're gone.

   There is rarely a really good staff-to-resident ratio, so it's just not possible for good CNA's to get to everyone on their roster, to get the cares they need. It's a cold, hard, fact that there is never enough staff (except for a few boutique homes), to adequately feed, bathe, groom, dress, toilet, move all the residents.  

   The advice given all the time to people wanting to check a nursing home is to visit, multiple times, at varying times of the day. You can observe how meals are going, if residents are out of their rooms, if they are dressed and groomed, planned activities, and yes, how the place smells.  Activities are very different from early morning to evening. Our family doesn't believe there is ever a really good home --- no such thing. Until there is far more staff, nothing will change. Until more CNA's

can be trained, and hired, nothing will change. And that won't change while CNA's are paid so little for the amount of mental and physical work they do.

 Another, generally accepted fact about care is that residents who have family that regularly visit, specifically. observe how well 'mom' is being cared for, get better care.

   Profit/non is irrelevant, imho.


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,550
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

Message 17 of 18 (1,627 Views)

I guess one of my questions would be, "What's really not-for-profit .. and how do they pay the bills?" My second concern is that except for a 5 or 10 minute tour of a a few places, how much can a layman truly know about ALL the facilities in their region? And conditions people may have had 5+ years ago with a facility, may be significantly changed now.

 

I don't want to register on your website, and it's time-consuming to look at each facility individually, to identify which ones are not-for-profit & which are for profit. I will say that if anyone thinks that the ones that are not for profit are less expensive, that's not accurate. There's one place on the list that I checked out for my Mom years back, and their daily rate was almost double that of the other similarly rated facilities in the area. It was a beautiful, newer facility, but was so "spacious" as to be not user-friendly for people there who where trying to get around on their own with wheelchairs, walkers or canes.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
Conversationalist
Posts: 7
Registered: ‎09-06-2016

Are non-profit nursing homes better than for profit ones?

[ Edited ]
Message 18 of 18 (1,477 Views)

There are lots of data on the internet especially government websites that people use to compare and rate nursing homes. However, many people told me those ratings are not true reflections of quality of care. They also told me in general non-profit nursing homes are better than for profit ones.

Is that true? From the few nursing homes I know it seems to be. What do you think?

If non-profit ones are better, how come that was not captured in the data? For instance, in CMS 5-star rating system, there is no indication of this. I also have a nursing home rating website that shows no such difference.