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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

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Message 1 of 10 (2,199 Views)

Highbrow's courses, as discussed, are not advanced level learning, and one earns no degree or certificate, nevertheless, I think they contain both apropos and accessibly presented data. Take today's lesson, presented here in its entirety:

 

Episode #7 of 10
A serious person's guide to positive thinking

The Inner Golden Rule
by Mitch Horowitz

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I want to open today’s lesson with a confession. Shortly before I began writing these words, I felt that some unnamed factor was stymying my progress in life. Something was limiting my ability to envision and pursue higher possibilities for myself and others. I was stuck in a holding pattern.

The key to my problem appeared in the Golden Rule. The precept “do unto others as you would have them do unto you” runs through virtually every religious and ethical teaching, from the Talmud to the Gospels to the Bhagavad Gita. Dubbed the Golden Rule in late 17th-century England, this dictum can today seem overly familiar or cliché. But the Golden Rule holds an inner truth that can make all the difference in your life.

 

In his 1928 book The Law of Success, Napoleon Hill related the Golden Rule to the phenomenon of autosuggestion, or the suggestions we continually make to ourselves. What we internally repeat and believe takes root in our subconscious and shapes our self-image and perceptions of the surrounding world. This is a profound and determinative fact.

 

But note carefully—the same autosuggestive process is also triggered by what we think about others. “Your thoughts of others are registered in your subconscious mind through the principle of autosuggestion,” Hill wrote, “thereby building your own character in exact duplicate.” Hence: “You must ‘think of others as you wish them to think of you.’”

 

Let’s consider Hill’s point of view more fully:
Stated in another way, every act and every thought you release modifies your own character in exact conformity with the nature of the act or thought, and your character is a sort of center of magnetic attraction, which attracts to you the people and conditions that harmonize with it. You cannot indulge in an act toward another person without having first created the nature of that act in your own thought, and you cannot release a thought without planting the sum and substance and nature of it in your own subconscious mind, there to become a part and parcel of your own character.

 

Grasp this simple principle and you will understand why you cannot afford to hate or envy another person. You will also understand why you cannot afford to strike back, in kind, at those who do you an injustice. Likewise, you will understand the injunction, “Return good for evil.”


When we indulge in fantasies of revenge or score-settling—which I’ve done during morning shaves more times than I can count—we not only shackle ourselves to past wrongs but also to the wrongs that we would do in exchange. Our acts of violence, whether by mind, talk, or hand, reenact themselves in our psyches and perceptions. We are lowered to the level of people we resent or even hate when we counter, mentally or otherwise, their type of behavior. An adjunct to the Golden Rule is “We become what we don’t forgive.”


Conversely, thoughts of generosity and forgiveness add a special solidity to our character, Hill notes, “that gives it life and power.”

 

Our thoughts about ourselves and about others can be seen as an invisible engine that molds our character and experience. This is why it is extremely important to abstain from spreading or listening to gossip or character assassination.

 

If you find yourself bumping against limits or having difficulty formulating and acting on your plans, reconsider your relationship to the Golden Rule.

 

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The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

30 Day Mental Challenge (Highbrow lesson)

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Today's Highbrow lesson, I thought, might be interesting to many:

 

The 30 Day Mental Challenge
by Mitch Horowitz


American philosopher William James (1842-1910) yearned to find a practical philosophy—one that produced concrete improvements in happiness.

 

The Harvard physician grew encouraged, especially in his final years, by his personal experiments with New Thought, which he called “the religion of healthy-mindedness.” I challenge people today to continue James’ search for a testable, workable system of ethical and spiritual development. Try this 30-day experiment that puts positive-mind dynamics to the test.

 

The exercise is based on a passage from a 1931 book, Body, Mind, and Spirit by Elwood Worcester and Samuel McComb, in which a prominent scientist describes radically improving his life through a one-month thought experiment. I have condensed his testimony:


Up to my fiftieth year I was unhappy, ineffective, and obscure. I had read some New Thought literature and some statements of William James on directing one’s attention to what is good and useful and ignoring the rest. Such ideas seemed like bunk – but feeling that life was intolerable I determined to subject them to a month-long test.


During this time I resolved to impose definite restrictions on my thoughts. In thinking of the past, I would dwell only on its pleasing incidents. In thinking of the present, I would direct attention to its desirable elements. In thinking of the future, I would regard every worthy and possible ambition as within reach.

 

I threw myself into this experiment. I was soon surprised to feel happy and contented. But the outward changes astonished me more. I deeply craved the recognition of certain eminent men. The foremost of these wrote me, out of the blue, inviting me to become his assistant. All my books were published. My colleagues grew helpful and cooperative.

 

It seems that I stumbled upon a path of life, and set forces working for me which were previously working against me.


Here is how to devise your own experiment: 1) Choose your start date. 2) Write out the entire testimony above by hand. This helps you remember it and feel a sense of ownership over it. 3) After you have written it, create a personal contract by adding: “I dedicate myself on this day of ___________to focus on all that is nourishing, advancing, and promising for thirty days, (signed) ___________________________.”

 

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The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Highbrow Lesson: The Serious Person's Guide to Positive Thinking

Message 3 of 10 (2,287 Views)

So this is the course I'm taking at present. Life with my con-artist father served as a pretty good primer on human behavior and motivations, however it has been a subject I've studied throughout life.

 

I don't often have to work to be positive, it comes naturally for me. Others, I know, do have to work at it: and why not? A positive mindset improves your overall health.

 

These are not college level courses, and they are not meant to be. Instead they are meant to be accessible. Here's today's text:


The Three-Step Miracle
by Mitch Horowitz


Here is a way to start thinking differently about how you use your mind. Imagine that a genie offered you a wish, but with a catch—you had to tell him the truth about what you really wanted, otherwise you’d lose everything.

 

We repeatedly tell ourselves what we think we want (“a better house,” “a new love,” etc.), but rarely do we subject our desires and wishes to mature, sustained scrutiny. Often, we do not know what we want from life at all.

 

A powerful, simple exercise will blow open how you think about your desires. I call it the Three-Step Miracle. The exercise comes from a beguiling little pamphlet published anonymously in 1926 under the title It Works. In actuality, the author was a Chicago-based salesman named Roy Herbert Jarrett (1874-1937). Jarrett tested his theory for years and didn’t put it in writing until he was past the age of 50.

 

This program consists of three simple steps. Remember: to benefit, you must do them with total commitment.

 

1. Carefully devise a list of what you really want from life. Revise it, rewrite it, and work on it every day. Throw your certainties out the window. Keep rewriting and reorganizing your list until it feels absolutely right.

 

2. Read your list morning, noon, and night; think about it always. Commit to reading it in a quiet, contemplative atmosphere each morning upon waking, again at midday, and once more just before drifting to sleep at night. (Later you’ll see why this timing is important.) Carry it with you in a pocket notebook or on a laminated index card.

 

3. Tell no one what you are doing. You must keep your list to yourself. This is not to cultivate some air of mystery but rather to prevent others—friends, relatives, coworkers—from making casually negative comments that shake your resolve (a favorite human pastime). These dreams belong to you. They are intimate, powerful, and private.

 

Then, express gratitude each time results arrive.

 

That’s it? Yes, that’s it. How can something so simple really work? Because this exercise pushes us to do something that we think we do all the time but rarely try—honestly come to terms with our innermost desires. Most of us drift through life lazily thinking that we want a new house, a loving mate, a better job, and so on. But the things that we repeat inside can merely mirror what we believe would make us look good in the eyes of others or what our upbringing or peers tell us we should want. Or our desires may be fleeting fantasies—we want ice cream, so to speak, until the next thing catches our eye. All of this can obfuscate our most authentic aims and yearnings.

 

Ask yourself once more: have you ever sat down, in a mature and sustained manner, stripped of all convention and inhibition, and probed, with unsparing honesty, what you really want from life? Someone who scoffs at money may discover that he truly craves wealth. A person who has dedicated herself to promoting others may find that she hungers for the spotlight. A corporate climber may see that he just wants a quiet life at home.

 

You cannot harness the mental assets covered in this course unless you know where you want to go. When you do, you will discover resources that you never knew you had.

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

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Message 4 of 10 (2,357 Views)

Prosecco6247 wrote:

Well, so far so good!  This was the first day of my first course.  Much more brief than I expected but laid out in a sensible way and left me curious for more.

 

I have to be frank, though.  I was disappointed after reading the example you linked.  I went to the website and found it to be too meandering and simple for my tastes and wondered if all of the mini-courses were like this.  Good to know there are more substantive offerings as well.  I imagine it's difficult to maintain consistency & quality with volunteer course writers.

 

I was mildly surprised to find the requisite "ads" for this free service are (so far) unobtrusive.  Annoying ads can take the pleasure out of anything.  I use ad blockers regularly for just this reason.


Oh good! I hope you enjoy the remains.

 

Nope, these courses aren't deep discussions, and there is variance. I'll take a few full courses, get bored or busy, skip a month, go back to it. I think of these quick readings as a way to have a little extra something to chew on during the day. Smiley Happy 

 

Oh yeah, I use ad blocker too. I wasn't aware they had ads, so I guess my blocker is working well. Smiley Happy (Silly I didn't think to check that.)

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,415
Registered: ‎10-15-2013

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

Message 5 of 10 (2,363 Views)

Well, so far so good!  This was the first day of my first course.  Much more brief than I expected but laid out in a sensible way and left me curious for more.

 

I have to be frank, though.  I was disappointed after reading the example you linked.  I went to the website and found it to be too meandering and simple for my tastes and wondered if all of the mini-courses were like this.  Good to know there are more substantive offerings as well.  I imagine it's difficult to maintain consistency & quality with volunteer course writers.

 

I was mildly surprised to find the requisite "ads" for this free service are (so far) unobtrusive.  Annoying ads can take the pleasure out of anything.  I use ad blockers regularly for just this reason.

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

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Message 6 of 10 (2,406 Views)

I've just completed the Small Habits That Yield Big Results course. Here's the lesson that came in today's email inbox:

 

Determine The Daily Win
by Joe Bennett


This is the most recent addition for me. I’ve always liked to win. I grew up as an athlete, and in that framework, it was easy to know what winning looked like and the exact moment victory was achieved.

 

Now, as an adult living a life that’s not based on sports and games, I’ve found it difficult to know what winning means.

 

Until lately, I just never knew if I was doing well. Subconsciously, I always felt frustrated, like no traction was happening.

 

Now, I look at the day and think, “What does it mean to win today?” I try to highlight just one thing. “If I get this one thing accomplished, that’s a win!”

 

Admittedly, I thrive on achievement, but I think we all do at some level. And who doesn’t want to be productive and make the most of every day?

 

Your “winning” doesn’t have to even be accomplishments or achievements. It can be small if you want or something super challenging.


How you do it

The best time to determine what winning looks like is the night before. Write down in your journal what it means to win the next day. Or, if you need to, do it first thing in the morning.

 

Doing it the night before helps you hit the ground running right when you get out of bed. Writing it down helps you make it concrete and committed.

 

Resist the temptation to do more than one thing. You’ll naturally do more than just that during the day, but remember, that one thing you wrote down—that’s the treasure you’re after. Let it be one thing so you can focus and get it done.

 

Now, if you get it done and you have a lot more daylight left, go ahead and conquer something else, but don’t divert your efforts between 2 or more things.


The benefit to you

You’ll start getting sh*t done (At least 365 things a year!).


You’ll form a powerful habit of committing to doing something and then doing it. This alone will make you stand out from most of humanity.


You’ll feel like a rockstar every day because you defined what it meant to win and you did what it took to get the win!

 

The science

Our brains are really amazing. They’re great at focusing on and then accomplishing stuff one. thing. at. a. time.

 

At least this is true regarding the neocortex. This is the advanced part of your brain used for problem-solving and attention. It’s also the most resource-demanding part of your brain.

 

It takes a lot of effort to focus on one thing and get it done no matter what it is. People who create long to-do lists only handicap their neocortexes by throwing too many problems at it.

 

This is why writing what you want to win down the night before and then just keeping it to one thing works. It allows your neocortex to focus on solving the problems that come up for a singular accomplishment.


Congrats on completing the course! I hope you’re already starting to see the effects of what you’ve learned. Remember to celebrate each time you do one of these small habits and you’ll see them take root even faster.

 

Head over to thejoebennett.com for more inspiration!


The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

Message 7 of 10 (2,419 Views)

@Prosecco6247 Whoops, missed this:

 

(I found that many of the topics were included in other course work and continuing education classes I have completed in the past.)
Yeah, this isn't in-depth, job skill adding learning and there is a bit of review. I've found, though, that review of information I'm not going to use right away is good for retention. (It takes a few tries to get something into my hard head. Smiley Happy )

 


Do they award teen-tiny degrees upon completion? ;o)

 

LOL! Maybe we should hold our own graduation ceremonies? Smiley Tongue

 


 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

Message 8 of 10 (2,423 Views)

Prosecco6247 wrote:
Interesting concept...sounds as if some enterprising internet entrepreneur found a way to organize his penchant for surfing the web. Definitely a way to increase one's erudition. Lot of topics to choose from but I wonder if many folks don't favor the familar over the variety? (I found that many of the topics were included in other course work and continuing education classes I have completed in the past.)

My "inbox" is pretty full now but I will add it to my ongoing list of things to try since they apparently add new topics and solicit new mini-courses.

Do they award teen-tiny degrees upon completion? ;o)

You might even see about writing up a course (now that would be fun...)

 

I suspect, given the way of things, these guys plan to grow their service into a viable IPO. At which time, it is likely they'll either accept advertising (and annoy us to the max) or try offering some value-added service. Right now they have 200,000 users, so that's neither an IPO nor is it a good ad buy.  

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 1,415
Registered: ‎10-15-2013

Re: Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

Message 9 of 10 (2,428 Views)
Interesting concept...sounds as if some enterprising internet entrepreneur found a way to organize his penchant for surfing the web. Definitely a way to increase one's erudition. Lot of topics to choose from but I wonder if many folks don't favor the familar over the variety? (I found that many of the topics were included in other course work and continuing education classes I have completed in the past.)

My "inbox" is pretty full now but I will add it to my ongoing list of things to try since they apparently add new topics and solicit new mini-courses.

Do they award teen-tiny degrees upon completion? ;o)
"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 3,362
Registered: ‎04-07-2015

Free Lifelong Learning Through Highbrow

Message 10 of 10 (2,453 Views)

Do you want to keep your brain functioning as you age, they ask. Well sure, we all say. Then they tell us to eat this, not that, to exercise for this long, every day and to keep learning.

 

Are you exhausted yet? Smiley Happy

 

I've found a way to make at least the learning part of a healthy lifestyle easier: Highbrow. (Web site: http://gohighbrow.com)

 

Highbrow: How it worksHighbrow: How it works

 

Highbrow is a free email-based learning service that I've been using for a couple of years. One signs up for a 10-day course, and each weekday, receives an email with a 5-minute reading on the selected subject along with suggestions for further independent study.

Highbrow Learn, Grow, Repeat.pngWhen the course concludes, simply select another from over a 100 courses over a dozen categories including: ART BUSINESS HEALTH HISTORY LANGUAGES NATURE PHILOSOPHY PRODUCTIVITY PSYCHOLOGY SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY and TRAVEL.

 

Screenshot of a few of the coursesScreenshot of a few of the courses

Highbrow courses are easy, informative, fast and free. You can sign up in seconds. So now that's solved, we can go back to figuring out what to eat and how many calories we've burned today. Smiley Happy

 

For more information, check out Highbrow’s FAQ page: http://gohighbrow.com/faq/

 

 

 

 

 

 

The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical. - Julius Erving